Jeremy H. Greenberg: Blog http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog en-us (C) Jeremy H. Greenberg jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) Sat, 02 Jun 2018 11:12:00 GMT Sat, 02 Jun 2018 11:12:00 GMT http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/img/s/v-5/u292078769-o383284609-50.jpg Jeremy H. Greenberg: Blog http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog 120 98 Blog #114 Teaching [Primary] Students to Shoot Film http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/6/blog-114-teaching-primary-students-to-shoot-film Blog #114 Teaching [Primary] Students to Shoot Film

 

Many of us are blessed and lucky to have caring and enthusiastic teachers in our primary years.  Their attitudes towards learning and the classroom are infectious. 

Nikon D610

I’ve mentioned in previous blogs that I teach photography. I have run workshops for students and adults. In the international school where I work we have a darkroom.  The students can sign up for a School Extension Activity or SEA Course that is an hour long after school class for about eight weeks. I host a be of these for students usually middle school or high school aged although we have had students participate who were as young as 10 years old. 

We use 35mm fully manual cameras and the students learn exposure, developing, and printing techniques. Aside from the fact that it’s loads of fun, there are benefits to teaching photography for me as well. 

Firstly, the information and activities needs to be organised and paced appropriately through the lessons. There is a lot of room for error and we must control for as many of these variables as possible as if we were conducting a formal experiment.  The developing chemicals and materials must be purchased and in stock ahead of the class and the darkroom instruments must be in fully working condition before the students begin. 

Darkroom techniques can vary and the students need just enough information to get results without having to know all of the underlying processes involved in developing film and making prints. 

Here’s the simple lesson plan:

  1. The first class is an introduction to the camera and exposure. 
  2. The second we go outside and shoot a roll of film. The students are then sent home with a spool and exposed (wasted) roll of 35mm Film to practice loading the film without looking. 
  3. The third class we develop a rolls and hang them to dry. Inset up the chemicals before the students arrive in the darkroom to save time. I usually cut and stuff the negatives into sleeves before the fourth class for them. 
  4. Next, we make contact sheets and one or two prints from their first roll. 
  5. We spend the remaining four classes shooting, developing, and mostly printing. 
  6. The students finish the class with a few good prints that I help them to frame and display in the corridor outside the darkroom designed for this purpose. 

It’s a pretty fast paced process and it’s great fun for me and for them. We can graduate to digital at some point and focus on compositional techniques, projects, and series as well in future SEA courses. It’s a true life skill to be able to make decent images. Today, it’s been said that everyone is a photographer. It’s also been said that if you shoot film, you’re a “real” photographer, whereas if you shoot digital, you’re an editor. Either way, preparing students for a lifetime of image making is benefit to them and their families. 

If you feel that you have what it takes to teach others, or you think that you might, I encourage you to give yourself the opportunity and see how it goes. 

Good luck! 

The light is always right.

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong

Subject: THS Students shooting their first roll of 35mm black and white film

Gear: Leica Minilux Point and shoot 35mm film camera + Agfa Vista Plus 400 Color 35mm film and Kodak Tri-X 400 Black and White 35mm film

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 Editor’s Favorite: Galleries: Week 4 Cities & People

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm class education film photographer photography professional students study teaching http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/6/blog-114-teaching-primary-students-to-shoot-film Sat, 02 Jun 2018 11:11:57 GMT
Blog #113 Umbrella [Series] http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-113-umbrella-series Blog #113 Umbrella [Series]

 

Umbrellas are a common site in Asian cities such as Hong Kong. Umbrellas are used to block the hot rays of the sun, keep the pouring rain off of our heads, and occasionally as defence for cans of tear gas shot from the Police during revolutions.  We Hongkongers carry an umbrella in our bag at ALL TIMES!

Nikon D610

In this week’s blog post, I will share a select few of the images that I have been collecting over the years from Hong Kong. One of the images is from China, see if you can guess which one it is.  

If you’ve got a “WR” [weather resistant] camera, head out to make some cool images of people in the rain with umbrellas.  I really enjoy street photography especially under these types of conditions.  I guess that there is an interesting element or gesture that we only get to see when it rains [or is super hot and sunny].  

Whatever your reason, bring that umbrella! 

Hey, you never know. 

 

Luck Favours The Prepared, Darling! -Edna Mode, The Incredibles, Pixar

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong

Subject: Umbrella Series from Hong Kong & China

Gear: Various, Mirrorless Fujifilm Digital Cameras & Lenses 

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year 2017 Editor’s Favorite: Galleries: Week 4 Cities & People

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) hong kong photographer photography professional series study umbrella http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-113-umbrella-series Tue, 22 May 2018 13:22:12 GMT
Blog #112 Wish You Were Here http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-112-wish-you-were-here Blog #112 Wish You Were Here

 

The epic Pink Floyd Album and song from 1975 Wish You Were Here leads me to my next point about making pictures [Watch this unplugged version for a real treat].  One of the goals of many photographers is to take the viewer there.  Travel, street photography, and landscape images can give the viewer a feel of actually being in the place in which the photograph was made.  This is one measure of images that work.  These images seem to reach beyond affecting the viewers sense of sight only and somehow come into contact with their senses of feeling, smell, or even hearing or taste. How can this be? 

Nikon D610

Images may connect with certain people more than others.  What is the mechanism that dictates this connection?  Images will connect [or not so much] through their capacity to evoke memories.  Hear me out.  Memories exist, in the environment.  Your brain is involved in the recollection of memories but not in a data-retrieval type of way like a hard drive.  Memories are not stored as little zeros and ones in the gray matter between your ears.   Memories are effectively constellations of brain activity [electro-chemical activity in your neurotransmitters] that have resulted from different combinations of sensory stimuli.  This comes from environment.  Your brain is simply along for the ride.

 

When you view certain images [environment] that have certain qualities these images might trigger, so to speak, experiences from your memory.  In this way, the viewer might actually feel that they are in the place that the image was made.  This is especially true when we have been to that place or a similar one that is presented in the image.  Images contain qualities and variables that will lend themselves to this effect on the viewer. 

Variables such as the type of light (i.e. color, direction, intensity or luminance) contrast, shadow, line, shape, texture, and atmosphere in any combination may evoke the experience of a memory in the viewer and give them the feeling that they are physically in the space where the image was made, albeit for a few seconds.  

Photographs are extensions of our own visual experience in the same way that reading is an extension of listening and writing an extension of speaker behavior.   It’s an amazing thing to consider that a photo is a slice of our own visual experience like a fraction of a second in a given place.  Making [and sharing] images that will be viewed in someone else’s future, transcending time, is extraordinary.  Time, of course, is an illusion after all. There is no time, per se, but only Spacetime.  Read Carol Rovelli’s Reality is Not What it Seems: The Journey To Quantum Gravity for a quick 2000 year summary of what we understand about the universe in a mere 265 pages! I digress. 

Anyway, is one of your goals in making and sharing images to take people on your personal visual roller coaster? If so, consider the variables mentioned above like texture and atmosphere and bake those juicy layers into your images.  You might strike a nerve with somebody who will go beyond the “👍🏼” and really feel you.

Finally, I agree with Bruce Gilden

If you can smell the street by looking at the photo, it’s a street photograph.

 

The light is always right.

 

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Ruby Bar, Pottinger Street, Central, Hong Kong

Subject:  Opening of Ruby Bar

Gear: Various:  Mirrorless Fujifilm X-E3 + XF Fujinon 18mm f/2 + On camera Flash

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) atmosphere connect images photographer photography professional study with http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-112-wish-you-were-here Sat, 19 May 2018 07:26:18 GMT
Blog #111 Change Your POV http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-111-change-your-pov Blog #111 Change Your POV

 

Just like pictures on the wall, we are accustomed to viewing images that were made from eye level.   This common point of view [POV] is a familiar starting place in which to view the world.  Changing POV in our images can lead to some interesting results. Shoot far, shoot near, shoot high, shoot low, point your lens up, point your lens down, and some amazing and fresh perspectives can be achieved.  

Nikon D610 Making images from alternative POV can be a a useful exercise in its own right and down right fun as well.  Let’s say you’re shooting an event, a holiday, or a sporting event, your top 20 images from a given shoot should likely contain images from various POV or else they will all look the same.  Yawn…Boring!

One of the street images that I am most proud of [children with smartphone] was made on a photo walk at night shooting very low to the ground “Worms eye view at night” was the assignment. Here are some homework assignments that can be done at your own pace.

 

  1. Shoot 100 different images all taken from a very low angle 
  2. Shoot 20 images with the lens pointed up and 20 with the lens pointed low.
  3. Shoot all images in a given day lower than your eye level such as crouched down a bit as if you were a child.  
  4. For one week, shoot ALL images from any POV other than your own eye level. 
  5. Find balconies, bridges,  or lofts and make 50 images looking down onto the street. 

Nikon D610

Shooting images with a different POV is a simple technique that needs to be practiced and has the benefit of adding a cool twist to your images.  Although images with differing POV can be fun they are not necessarily an end unto themselves.  These should be incorporated into some project that you are working on and they ought to be appropriate for that project.   

 

Drone photography is all the range these days.  Franky, I’m not feeling the airborne bug.  Anyway, images ought to have subjects, and compositional techniques that draw the viewers eye to the subject regardless of the POV.  Drone images are not impervious to these factors that make certain images work.

Think big, think project-based and then, if appropriate to the given project, include images with varying POV.

 

The light is always right.

 

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Around Town in Hong Kong & Xi’an, China

Subject:  Various POV Images

Gear: Various assortment of lightproof boxes including Nikon D610,  Mirrorless Fujifilm X-Series, 35mm Film Cameras, and iPhone

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 DSCF4249DSCF4249Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 XE2S3681XE2S3681Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) of photographer photography point pov professional study view http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-111-change-your-pov Fri, 18 May 2018 11:48:41 GMT
Blog #110 Bikes [Series] http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-109-bikes-series Blog #110 Bikes [Series]

In this week’s blog, I will share another series that I’ve been working on.  I must admit my admiration for the bicycle as a practical means of transportation, great exercise, and a pretty cool machine that is flat out fun.  The bicycle has been around for more than one hundred years and seems to be gaining popularity in cities in Europe and the US.  Hong Kong has jumped on the band wagon and has a public ride sharing service recently.  

Nikon D610

In developing Asian countries, bicycles are used widely due to their relatively inexpensive cost and reliability.  The images here are a few of the bike pictures from my series that spans many years and many cities and countries (see below).

Additionally, I want to mention that LensWork online is a great resource for new or experienced photographers.  The podcasts are particularly thought-provoking and cover a wide range of topics pertaining to photography and the creative process.  They do a Seeing in Sixes project that results in a published book. It’s really difficult to pick only six images from a series but a terrific practice in editing forcefully.  

I made a submission (Due: 15 June 2018) including some from this series. 

Always remember to keep the rubber side down.

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong, Rome, Xi’an, Angkor Wat, Provincetown, Osaka, Nagoya, Manila, Hanoi 

Subject:  Images from Bicycle Series

Gear: Various Mirrorless Fujifilm X-Series, 35mm Film Cameras, and iPhone

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 DSCF4973DSCF4973Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 img016-8img016-8Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) bicycles bikes hong kong photographer photography professional series study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-109-bikes-series Sat, 12 May 2018 12:55:10 GMT
Blog #109 Architectural Photography http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-109-architectural-photography Blog #109 Architectural Photography

Architecture includes any structure made by a person.  Buildings are beautiful! Architecture is like photography in that it is a seamless mix of art and science.  In this week’s blog post, I will share a few tips that you might want to consider when making pictures of architecture.  Remember CAM/O! The same guidelines apply to architectural shots as to all others. The subject should be pretty obvious [save abstract images], highlight he subject through framing and composition techniques, and minimisation or elimination of distractions are critical. 

Get High & Wide 

Use a wide angle lens like a 35mm, 28mm, 24mm, or ultra wide angle such as 21mm or wider.  The wide angle will be helpful to get relatively close while fitting the whole structure into your frame. Architecture has its challenges such as perspective distortion.  When you look up at a tall building, the sides seems to converge at the top. Due to the optical limitations of structure of our eyes this is natural, like looking down a long road.  Distortion is a nature phenomenon and is not necessarily a bag thing.  However, there are many circumstances where you might want to minimise or eliminate distortion in your images such as when when shooting interiors.

Nikon D610

Another inherent challenge in capturing images of buildings is the ship’s peak or crowning effect that your lens will apply to a corner of a building that might be near the camera when pointed upwards.  Wide angle lenses are terrific except for the distortion that wide angle lenses apply. The area in the centre patch of the frame will look disproportionally closer to the camera. When this effect is combined with perspective distortion such a shooting up at the corner of a building, your lens will tend to make the corner of the building look like the bow of a ship.  

If you want your lines to be straight when shooting structures [this applies to interior and exterior], you have two choices.  

  1. You can use a tilt shift lens which is made into two parts and you can adjust the lens plane in relation to the film [sensor] plane to correct the perspective distortion.  
  2. The second way to correct this is to simply get high.  I’m not suggesting that smoking marijuana will make your images look better but I’m saying that it won’t.  Get the camera up higher. If you are on the 10th floor of a building shooting a 20 story building across the street, for example, you can get all of the [vertical] lines very straight right in the camera.  For 1-2 story structures such as a house, stand on a ladder, tree stump, or another small object.  Raising the camera even a meter or two will correct a significant amount of perspective distortion and keep your vertical lines straight up and down. Simple!

Get Inside 

Interiors are a type of architectural image that can be fun and useful to shoot as well.  Use a tripod to get the camera around six feet high to keep the lines straight.  Light the room appropriately and evenly to accent or emphasise areas of interest in the scene.  Remember to tidy up and eliminate distractions. 

Nikon D610 DSC_0431DSC_0431Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Get Close

 

Architecture frequently contains many interesting albeit small details. Patterns, ornate carvings, details, or textures may make for interesting architectural photographs.  Use framing devices like shooting through windows or arches to add interest to your images.  You might occasionally include people to represent scale as a useful tool.  

 

So there you have it! Three tips for making the most out of architectural images.  Get high and wide, get inside, or get close. Finally, you’ll notice that most of the images in this post are black and white.  Buildings might not have particularly interesting colours so the black and white image aids the viewer in focusing on the line, shape, or pattern.  Black and white works well in architectural images. 

 

Try to tell a story through your images such as the intently dense apartment living in Hong Kong that is fairly unique to the rest of the world.  If you want to use a drone, that’s all fine and good but the “rules” of good composition and general image making apply to all genres within the craft such as macro, aerial, architectural, etc…

The light is always right.

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong, Viet Nam, Shenzhen, Central Japan, Taipei, Seoul, Province Town, USA, Nice, France.

Subject:  Architecture and Building Structures

Gear: Fujifilm X-Series Mirrorless Digital Cameras (X-T1, X-T2, X-E3) and 24mm, 28mm or 35mm lenses, 35mm film cameras, iPhone, and whatever else I happen to be wearing that day.

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 XE2S7033XE2S7033Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm architecture buildings photographer photography professional study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-109-architectural-photography Fri, 11 May 2018 10:28:17 GMT
Blog #108 Photography Quotes Part 3 http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-108-photography-quotes-part-3 Blog #108 Photography Quotes Part 3

In this week’s blog I will post a small collection of quotations from life and photography that I have collected since the last post of this type “Photography Quotes Part 2”.  This will be the third in this particular series of photography related quotations as food for thought. Part 1 was in Blog #31  and Part 2 was in Blog #70 if you’re just catching up with my blog posts.  Without further adieu, here it goes:

 

I went into photography because it seemed like the perfect vehicle for commenting on the madness of today's existence.

Robert Mapplethorpe

 

If a day goes by without my doing something related to photography, it’s as though I’ve neglected something essential to my existence, as though I had forgotten to wake up. Robert Mapplethorpe

 

Anybody can be a great photographer if they zoom in enough on what they love.

David Bailey

 

A Camera can serve as a passport to other lives and cultures but it also paradoxically stands between the photographer and the world.  We’re not participating, we’re observing, We’re trying to be inconspicuous; we’re trying to be not there, but there. 

So it’s a pretty lonely life. 

Wayne Miller

 

Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving. What you have caught on film is captured forever… It remembers little things, long after you have forgotten everything. Aaron Siskind

 

Style is very personal. It has nothing to do with fashion.  Fashion is over quickly. Style is forever.

Ralph Lauren

 

Focus on what you can control.

Being smart is cooler than anything in the world.

Choose people who lift you up.

Find people who will make you better.

Remember who you always were, where you came from, who your parents were, how they raised you.

Success doesn't count unless you earn it fair and square.

Success is only meaningful and enjoyable if it feels like your own.

The one thing people can't take away from you is your education.

There are still many causes worth sacrificing for, so much history yet to be made.

When you're not engaged in the day-to-day struggles that everybody feels, you slowly start losing touch.

Whether you come from a council estate or a country estate, your success will be determined by your own confidence and fortitude.

Michele Obama

 

Black and White are the colours of photography.  To me they symbolise the alternatives of hope and despair to which mankind is forever subjected.

Robert Frank

 

A good photograph is one that communicates a fact, touches the heart, and leaves the viewer a changed person for having seen it; it is in a word, effective. 

Irving Penn

 

Photography is more than a medium for factual communication of ideas.  

It’s a creative art. 

Ansel Adams

 

Regard no practice as immutable.  Change and be ready to change again.  Accept no eternal verity.  Experiment. 

B.F. Skinner

 

Color is to the eye what music is to the ear. 

Louis Comfort Tiffany

 

Behavior is a difficult subject matter, not because it is inaccessible, but because it is extremely complex.  Since it is a process, rather than a thing, it cannot be easily be held still for observation.  It is changing, fluid, evanescent, and for this reason it makes great technical demands upon the ingenuity and energy of the scientist.

B.F. Skinner 

 

The most important thing is to tell a personal story.  The most important aspect of any photographer’s work is their connection to the subject. If that connection is a wholesome, positive, exciting one, then work is going to inevitably speak to an audience. So that’s what documentary offers: an incredible opportunity to engage with an audience, to engage with the subject, and for that sense of commitment and excitement to shine through.

Martin Parr

 

The camera is an excuse to be someplace you otherwise don’t belong.  It gives me both a point of connection and a point of separation.

Susan Meiselas

 

The light is always right.

 

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Ap Lei Chau Hong Kong

Subject:  The Harbour School Photo Club @THS_PHOTO_CLUB

Gear: Leica Minlux + Agfa Vista Plus 400 35mm Colour Film

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm club film photo photographer photography professional quotes study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/5/blog-108-photography-quotes-part-3 Fri, 04 May 2018 10:40:38 GMT
Blog #107 TAX! http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-107-tax Blog #107 TAX!

Hong Kong is the best city in the world to get around in. Public transportation is excellent. Massive double-decker busses, mini-busses, ferries to the outer islands and across Victoria Harbour, the immaculate and efficient MTR, and of course taxis are inexpensive, fast, safe, frequent, and relatively clean. 

Nikon D610

Given that there are 7 million people or more who live in this tiny territory, and only 5% own private cars, the transportation system needs to be spot on and it is! In the last eight years that I’ve lived here, the only time that I really miss having a car is on a Friday morning, in the pouring rain, when there are there are no taxis and I’m trying to get to work.  Do you feel my pain? I know, I know, first world problems, I get it. 

 

So the taxi is like your private car in Hong Kong. Red ones travel around Hong Kong Island and Kowloon side, green are in the New Territories far north and blue are on Lantau Island only where the airport is. 

 

Hong Kong uses Toyota Crown Comfort models almost exclusively. It’s a late 1980s semi-boxy no-frills sedan type design. Frankly, I’m convinced that Toyota copied the VW Jetta Mark II (1984-1992) .  Anyway the red body and silver topped four-door sedan (saloon) is an icon.  It’s impossible not to take photos of Hong Kong taxis. The red colour shows up great on color film as well.  

In this week’s blog post, I offer a selection of Hong Kong Taxi images for your visual enjoyment. It’s an Ode To The Taxi that we all know and love, and take for granted. Vroom Vroom…

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Hong Kong Red Taxi Series

Gear: Mostly Fujifilm X-Series Mirrorless Digital Cameras and 28mm, 35mm, or 50mm lenses

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 XE2S2529XE2S2529Nikon D610 XE2S2531XE2S2531Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) hong kong photographer photography professional series study taxi travel http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-107-tax Fri, 27 Apr 2018 13:35:12 GMT
Blog #106 The Shadow Side http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-106-the-shadow-side Blog #106 The Shadow Side

In my last blog post, I confessed my obsession with series.  These are mere collections of images that have the same subject but otherwise vary in all other ways.  They may not be tied to a colour, place, style, medium, or anything else for that matter. Film, digital, it doesn’t matter.  I just like making pictures of signs as I illustrated in my last post Blog #105.

Nikon D610

There is a method to my madness, as they say.  These simple assignments force creativity and a fresh POV.  To keep myself interested I make images of the same subject but never in the same way.  I vary something, anything, everything, but keep the subject constant.  That’s my simple method.  It sounds easy but its not so easy in practice.  

Shadows are one of my series that I will share a bit here.  I love the sharp and high contrast that is characteristic of shadows.  Shadows can be of anything such as a tree, a person, a car, a building, or whatever.  You just need a strong enough light source and the proper angle to make a shadow.  Making images of shadows is a study in line and shape.  It’s really a means to an end, rather than a project or end unto itself.  Some artists are successful sharing their series as a series or stand-alone work.  That can work for some and more power to them.

If you are starting to make series at this point in your photography I suggest having no more than 10.  You will inevitably lose interest in a few of these over time and the result will be a core set of about five or so series that you will continue over the course of a year or longer.  When you tire of one, file it, and replace it. You might dig up an old series, dust it off, and take a stroll down memory lane or even add an image or two from time to time.  

Think of series as your artist sketch book. Who knows maybe some great body of work will emerge someday.  All great journeys start with one step said the great Chinese philosopher Lao Zi. Begin yours today!

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Shadow Series

Gear: A variety of light-proof boxes. Let’s face it, who gives a shit?

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) collection hong kong photographer photography professional series shadow study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-106-the-shadow-side Fri, 20 Apr 2018 12:20:41 GMT
Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-105-signs-signs-everywhere-a-sign Blog #105 Signs, Signs, Everywhere a Sign

 

Signs, signs, everywhere a sign…” 

Nikon D610

went the the song by Canadian group The Five Man Electrical Band in 1971.  This song was written in the same year as my birth.  Now, before you go doing the math, remember that age is just a number #tongueface.

Urban environments fascinate me. Cities are never just finished.  There is constant growth, decay, re-growth, and the cycle repeats. Urban environments are constantly bristling with activity like a human sized bee hive of commotion. This is what makes cities so awesome to make pictures in. There is literally never a dull moment. Dull moments are not dull at all. The absence of activity can be as or more striking than activity in a cityscape due to its rarity.  

Signs of all shapes and colours surround us.  Walking down the street is like living inside of a kindergarten child’s colouring book.  Many of these are brightly coloured to simultaneously grab the attention of drivers and warn them of what's ahead.  Form follows function in a simple but elegant construction that functions as communication. 

I am a bit of a hoarder, photographically speaking.  I collect images that I place in series. These are studies on a theme or subject that I enjoy collecting and collating from time to time.  I have about a dozen of these. Birds, shadows, signs, architecture, taxis, and other common objects that you find in and around cities are the subject of my series.  Trying to vary the images while staying with one subject can become an exercise in creativity.  I will present some of these sets in subsequent blogs. 

Here, I will share some images of ordinary road signs.  You know the great old master William Eggleston? Well, he had one of the first and most significant photography shows in colour at the MOMA.  This dude lived in a pretty simple and boring place called Memphis, Tennessee. However, through Eggleston’s lens, Memphis was anything but boring. He made simple and gorgeous images focusing on common objects, using line, form, and colour in a truly masterful way.  He was so influential that is could be said that he launched colour film into the mainstream art community who, prior to his show, mostly rejected colour altogether. 

I’m no Eggleston, but I do enjoy the challenge of finding shapes and colours to work with in a cityscape environment.  Street signs offer themselves as a great subject in which to work with. Construction sites are especially dense and rich with signs and colours.  Geometry shapes and color, what's not to love! It's like living inside of a box of Lucky Charms Cereal. 

If you’ve been shooting for a while, you might find that you gravitate towards dogs, or buildings, or reflections, or whatever. Work these subjects and work them long and hard. You might find a new angle, perspective, or point of view [POV] after a while.  Work the scene, or work the series. Either way, something wonderful just might be in that next frame. 

 

The light is always right.

 

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Signs Series, Streets of Hong Kong

Gear: Nikon F100 SLR, Minolta CLE + Leica 28mm lens, Kodak Ektar 100 35mm Color Film, Kodak Portra 400 35mm Color Film, Cinestill 800T 35mm Color Film 

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm cities collections film photographer photography professional series signs study urban http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-105-signs-signs-everywhere-a-sign Fri, 20 Apr 2018 11:59:55 GMT
Blog #104 Night Vision (at 3200 ISO) http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-104-night-vision-at-3200-iso Blog #104 Night Vision (at 3200 ISO)

 

When the sun hangs low and the golden hour has passed, you have about one more hour know as the blue hour before the day is gone.  The night provides some challenging but also great opportunities to make images of a different type.  It should be obvious that technical settings must change to be able to accommodate the lack of available light.  Digital and film photography have slightly different requirements for shooting at night. I will review these briefly here below. 

Nikon D610

Exposure is the combination of three variables; ISO, shutter speed, and aperture.  Most digital cameras have manual controls for each of these. Digital camera settings have adjustable ISO [sensor sensitivity] settings that you can crank up to 1600, 3200, 6400, or even higher and still produce usable images.  Using fast lenses and shooting wide open [low aperture] will facilitate night time shooting as well.  Given that we are limited [mostly] to making hand-held images with a 1/60 second or faster we can set the minimum shutter speed to this setting, shoot in aperture priory and let the camera decide what the lowest ISO can be for a given shot.  This will work most of the time if you can tolerate some digital noise in your images.  A flash used at night will provide obvious advantages but even flashes are limited in their reach and cannot be used in all situations.  Most people find them annoying, so use flashes at night sparingly especially when in public places. 

Shooting film at night presents its own challenges.  Film is produced with a specific ISO sensitivity.  Once the film is loaded, you can push the film to a higher than rated ISO but there are limitations to this process and for every stop pushed you will introduce additional grain, degrading the final image quality.  Unless you’re trying to emulate the Provoke style from Japan, image quality is something that you are likely trying to preserve. 

The shutter speed and aperture factors are similar between digital and film.  Film will have less dynamic range and will not respond quite as well to pushing as your digital camera will by adjusting the ISO dial to a higher number.  Still, film has a certain quality and atmosphere that can be very appealing, even at night.

Testing this process will teach you what you can do with film at night and learning how to control the light in low or challenging conditions is a valuable skill for all photographers. I recently stuffed a couple of rolls of Ilford Delta 3200 35mm black and white film in the back of my Nikon FE2 and headed out into the night.  The film can work well in lower light conditions but falls off pretty quickly in very low light conditions.  The exercise was interesting and I would encourage any photographer to experiment with this process. 

The light is always right, even at night

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg March 2018

Developed at home with Bergger Berspeed Developer & scanned on Epson Perfection V600 Photo

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Street Photography at Night

Gear: Nikon FE2 + 28mm f/2.0 lens + Ilford Delta 3200 35mm black and white film

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

 

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm film iso night photographer photography professional study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-104-night-vision-at-3200-iso Fri, 13 Apr 2018 13:11:55 GMT
Blog #103 Go Take a Hike http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-103-go-take-a-hike Blog #103 Go Take a Hike

 

There is a practice in Japan known as forest bathing. Essentially, the Japanese have discovered the therapeutic affects of walking in the forest on their bodies and overall health. Being in nature reduces blood pressure, heart rate, improves mood, provides you with fresh air, and  any number of additional benefits that we have yet to measure.  Given that around 80% of the worlds population live in urban environments where overcrowding, noise, pollution, and stress are rampant, many of us should be taking one from the Japanese playbook of life.  They also live longer than most and have the most number of centenarians than any other country. 

Nikon D610 Nikon D610

In Hong Kong, it’s an extremely dense urban environment will small living quarters and all the stresses of modern life.  However, Hongkongers also enjoy about 15 public beaches, and dozens of world class hiking trails.  

Photographers, even the uber professionals who strictly make their living behind a camera, thoroughly enjoy the activity of making pictures even when off duty.  Many of us consider our time looking through the viewfinder (or at the 3”x3” LCD screen if you prefer) as a type of visual meditation.  Meditation of any type can be therapeutic.  For those who are not making pictures, commercially, making pictures is a refreshing escape from the normal routine and stresses of their primary occupation. 

Why not combine the therapeutic aspects of hiking in the great outdoors and making pictures at the same time? It’s sort of like listening to music and riding a bicycle. Both are fun in their own right, but by combining them we enhance the benefits of each.  In the spring or fall time, when the weather is agreeable, grab your default camera perhaps a roll or two of your favourite film and head outside.  If family or friends join, the more the merrier.  

Back in March, this was exactly what I did and had a blast doing it.  The images here were shot on Po Toi Island, my favourite hiking spot in Hong Kong.  Accessible only by ferry, the rocks, sky, and ocean views are absolutely stunning.  The time to get outside is here with spring and the milder weather. So, as the old saying goes, 

Go Take a Hike! [and don’t forget your camera or three].

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg March 2018

Where: Po Toi Island, Hong Kong

Subject:  Landscapes, random family members and friends

Gear: 

  1. Nikon FE2 + 24mm f/2.8 lens + Red #25 filter with Rollei Infrared 35mm black and white film
  2. Fujifilm GA645 + Rollei CR 200 120 roll Medium format film

 

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm film hike hiking landscape nikon photographer photography professional study travel http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-103-go-take-a-hike Thu, 12 Apr 2018 13:55:20 GMT
Blog #102 Film Glorious Film! http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-102-film-glorious-film Blog #102 Film Glorious Film!

In Charles Dickens epic novel, A Tale of Two Cities (1859) he begins, 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of believe, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.”

 

Nikon D610

Strangely, these words could have been written last week and they could easily resonate with us in the same manner.  Dickens’ two cities of course were London and Paris and he wrote about them in the years prior to the French Revolution.  Let’s hope we don’t go there again,  although the recent student protests in the US on gun control are a sort of revolution.  Let’s hope that they succeed in their mission. 

In terms of photography, it is the best of times and the worst of times for us, too.  We are living in an explosively creative age where film still exists in its perfect form and we have the newer technologies of digital at our fingertips with all of the magic of the darkroom and post processing but pushed even further.  Digital offers instant developing, almost unlimited picture making, and wider dynamic range.  Post processing theses days is way beyond anything that was ever possible in the darkroom. 

Still, there has been a resurgence of film and all things analog in the last decade.  In David Sax’s The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter (2017), he describes in great detail the increase of vinyl, paper, idea, and of course film.  The story of Film Ferrania’s coming back from the dead is included.  News of Kodak’s Ektachrome return has been anxiously awaited by die hard film fans.  Howver, all of the news is not so rosey.

Agfa Photo’s Vista plus in 200 & 400 speeds has been a gorgeous color film for some time now.  It’s days are numbered according to a recent announcement by Agfa [a German & Japanese Cooperative].  Fujifilm, who has produced some of the best film in the market for more than 80 years, announced this week that they are stopping Neopan Acros 100.  This is particularly sad since Acros 100 is one of the best low ISO (very fine grain) black and white films available.  While they continue to pump out install by the truck load, the old style films seem to be fading.

I guess all good things must come to an end. Besides, we still have many other tools at our disposal.  It is not the camera or the film that makes the image, after all.  It’s you who make the image.  Whatever tool you decide, use all of your creative facets to make the best images that you can.  That’s what we need to be focused on and only that.  Discussions of gear and film options are fun but tend to distract from the objective of making novel, meaningful images.  Keep your eye on the prize. 

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg March 2018

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Gear: Nikon F100 + Nikon AF Nikkor 24-85mm zoom f/ 2.8-4.0 

Film Agfa Vista plus 200 [35mm] + Kodak Ektar 100 [35mm]

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

 

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 365 creative creativity film photographer photography professional study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-102-film-glorious-film Sat, 07 Apr 2018 04:34:32 GMT
Blog #101 Alexander Rodchenko @ F11 Photo Museum http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-101-alexander-rodchenko-f11-photo-museum Blog #101 Alexander Rodchenko @ F11 Photo Museum 

Alexander Rodchenko was born in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1891.  After art school, he got hooked on photography.  His work is absolutely amazing! To say that he was ahead of his time would be a understatement.  Photography had been invented some 60 years or so before he came to the field.  The work that preceded him could be described as simplistic or formal.  Compositions and portraits were straight forward in the early days of photography.  This was the case mostly due to the limitations of the gear.  Cameras were big and heavy along with the glass plates and complicated not to mention unreliable chemistry that was needed.  In the 1930s with the 35mm film size and small portable Leica cameras, the world of photography exploded and Rodchenko was there to light the fuse.  

Nikon D610

His point of view was ever changing.  He got close like really close to his subjects. He got so close that at times he was underneath his subjects aiming straight up at them from their chest or perhaps knees.  His careful attention to line and form was clear in his work with architecture and construction of the day.  He made images of a great dam that was constructed in Russia that was particularly notable. 

Rodchenko had [at least] three unique stylists trademarks that burned his place in photography brilliance for all of eternity.  The first was his penchant to tilt the lens and compose from one of the bottom corners of the frame.  He used this technique so frequently that it should have resulted in the coming of the term Russian Angle rather than the more commonly termed Dutch Angle that is widely used in film and movie making to this day.

The second interesting and rather unorthodox technique used by Rodchenko was his framing of his printed photos.  He used mostly square or rectangular format printing but the image was placed in a refreshing variety of locations within the matting and frame itself.  He would mount the image off-center such as in the top or bottom half of the frame, or off to one side of the frame.  The image seemed to have come to rest after floating organically within the four corners of the frame but in some random location.  This mounting technique was in stark contrast to the simple square mounting style of the day.  He was likely one of the first, if not the first to mix things up in this way.  

Third, Rodchenko used a single matte colour such as red or blue to accentuate his black and white images.  Of course there were only monochrome images back then so he used the matte to set off the colour and make things a bit more lively.  

These were wonderfully rendered and presented images in their own right.  The artist’s use of tilt, framing, and colour added to the artistic quality of the images that was rather edgy for its time.  I attended a recent exhibition at F11 Foto Museum in Happy Valley, Hong Kong that would have made Rodchenko very proud had he been able to view this meticulously curated exhibit.  The images here were made at the museum exhibit.  I hope that you can have a sense of the work and interesting style that Rodchenko has left us with.  

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg March 2018

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Alexander Rodchenko Exhibit @ F11 Foto Museum, Happy Valley, Hong Kong

Gear: iPhone X

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) angle dutch framing masters photographer photography professional rodchenko study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/4/blog-101-alexander-rodchenko-f11-photo-museum Fri, 06 Apr 2018 02:44:14 GMT
Blog #100! #ShootFilmNotBullets http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-100-shootfilmnotbullets Blog #100! #ShootFilmNotBullets

 

Wow! I’ve reached 100! If you are reading this then you might have been riding this creative and photographic roller coaster with me for some time now. Blog #1 was 9 July 2015 about two years and eight months ago from today.  That works out to be about three posts per month in almost two years, but whose counting?  

I have something special for this centennial blog post.  It’s a bit more serious than my usual posts.  You might consider these words and the following images as social documentary or perhaps photojournalism.  I’m writing this on Monday 26 March, 2018.  Yesterday, around the US in dozens of cities the #MarchForOurLives anti-gun protests took the country [and world] by storm.  Students around the nation organised speeches and walk outs on the very sensitive matter pertaining to gun control.  A march in support of our American brothers and sisters was held here in Hong Kong.  About 700 or more Americans and others took place.  I was there to document this significant event. 

Nikon D610

In case you’ve been living under rock for the last decade, there have been a rash of school shootings in the states and we’ve all had about enough of that bullshit.  Students are sitting in class one minute and the next they’re lying in a pool of their own innocent blood.   This has got to stop.  The zeitgeist  of the students in the states is definitely one of #EnoughIsEnough with the bloody gun problem.  Trumpism is probably helping to mobilize the students since Trump himself and his republican cronies are likely part of the problem rather than the solution.  They accept campaign money and other perks from the NRA so they fail to act against them in a classic conflict of interest scenario.  

Nikon D610 One day in the not-so-distant past, America basically decided that a few student deaths and school shooting here and there was an acceptable price to pay for the right and privilege to basically be able to walk in to a grocery store, and walk out with a semi-automatic machine gun. WTF? Now I fully understand that there are responsible citizens who love shooting on a range or folks who hunt for sport.  To them I say, #ShootFilmNotBullets, #BooksNotBullets, and #EnoughisEnough.  Find a new hobby, bro!

Nikon D610

Minimum ages, background checks, annual registration and interviews, mental health exams and zero access to automatic weapons should not even be up for debate here for regular untrained citizens.  As an American living abroad, I’m embarrassed that our government has essentially done nothing to chill this situation out.  John Paul Stevens, a retired associate justice go the United States Supreme Court advocated recently in a Times Op-Ed piece about repealing the second amendment! Just stop the whole crazy train dead in its tracks. Imagine that! 

Now, the issue is complicated and steeped in American tradition, revolutionary war, independence, the Constitution, Second Amendment, and all that jazz.  Nevertheless, last year about 10 people died from guns in all of Japan.  Hong Kong doesn’t have a gun problem.  Other developed nations have minuscule amounts of gun deaths and gun violence, and  rarely if ever in schools.  America is great at many things but America is not great at everything.  It needs to turn its attention to attacking this issue like it did in the 1960s when it decided, as a nation, that it would send a man to moon and bring him back again. Fortunately, the millennials are trying to help those in office these days to do their jobs and clean up this shitty mess already! Only then will America truly be great again.  Until then, the lunatics are running the asylum, but not for long. 

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg March 2018

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  #MarchForOurLives Hong Kong March and Protest Support Event

Gear: Leica M6 + 35mm f/2 + Yellow #8 Filter + Kodak TRI-X400 + BERSPEED & 

Fujfilm X-E3 + Fujinon Super EBC XF 18-55mm 1:2.8-4 R LM OIS

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #18 Criticizing Photographs or Beyond the “like”

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

Blog #95 RED

 

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm documentary film photographer photography photojournalism professional social study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-100-shootfilmnotbullets Sat, 31 Mar 2018 14:37:44 GMT
Blog #99 High-Key http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-99-high-key Blog #99 High-Key

There are many techniques involved in making images.  You can use various films, papers, screens, and even other materials like canvas, metal, or wood. There are also many ways to present the image itself.  There is the “properly” exposed image which in itself is debatable although the camera can usually do this by itself when set to auto exposure mode. 

During a traditional portrait shoot and lighting, the “Key” or main light is usually placed near the camera or slightly camera left or right.  The “fill” is then placed almost 90 degrees to the key or main light to do exactly what you might expect which is to fill up the shadows made from the key light with more light.  The fill is usually less than the key but it can be equal to the key for evenly spread light.  This type of lighting is common in professional portraits, headshots, advertising, commercial, fashion, and product photography. The subject should be well lit in these types of images.  

Nikon D610

Then there is High Key or Low Key for example.  Low Key or Film Noir types of images tend to be dark and moody.  There is an air of mystery or even a downright eerie feeling to low-key shots.  High-Key images have a lack of contrast or low contrast.  Shadows are minimal to non-existent. They are light, airy, and tend to have an uplifting mood to them.  Portraits tend to have a dreamy or even an angelic quality.  Some very high-key images tend to have a penciled or sketched effect to them.  

Each [high or low-key] represents a lighter or darker rendition of the properly exposed image to accentuate the mood of the image. Light vs. dark, yin vs. yang, good vs. evil, and on and on. 

Although High-Key images can be presented in black and white or colour, black and white is the more common. 

 

Black and white are the colours of photography.  To me they symbolise the alternatives of hope and despair to which mankind is forever subjected.

Robert Frank

 

I agree with Mr. Frank. 

 

The light is always right.

jhg

 

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg 

Where: Hong Kong

Subject:  Various Portrait, Street Photography, and Urban Landscapes 

Gear: Fujifilm Mirrorless, Nikon 35mm film cameras

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm film high-key hi-key photographer photography professional study technique http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-99-high-key Sat, 31 Mar 2018 05:04:31 GMT
Blog #98 You better WORK! http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-98-you-better-work Blog #98 You better WORK!

Last month, I hosted a workshop in collaboration with six members of a local photography walk group Shutter AllianceThe format of the workshop was approximately as follows:

[9:00 - 10:00] Introduction and Keynote presentation on Basic Photography and Composition / Assignment to approach stranger and request making a portrait of that person: Office Meeting Room 

[10:00 - 11:30] Walk outside an make interesting street photos that work: Streets around Kennedy Town

[11:30 - 1:30] Each member loads three images into Lightroom for critique: Office Meeting Room

Using a 15” Macboook Pro and Adobe Lightroom software, each member loaded their SD card and selected their best three images for the live group critique.  The laptop was connected to a projector and images were displayed one at a time on a proper screen while the group sat around at a couple of round tables in an office setting. 

The focus of the workshop was really the critique component.  The activity of critiquing images is really about describing.  The goal of the exercise was to talk about the different parts of each image, discuss if the image works or did not work and why that might be the case.  

The group was very engaged and there was a range of experiences.  These were hobbyist or amateurs and to my knowledge none of the participants were professional photographers.  Nevertheless, the images produced in this short one hour and a half session were very impressive.  There were maybe 2-3 images of the 18 displayed (not counting my own) that did not work.  There was promising work displayed and we aimed to use some of the vocabulary from the earlier presentation to use in the critique session.  

The group was clearly engaged and benefited from the experience.  We ended the workshop on time at around 1:30 and parted ways.  One participant joined my later that afternoon at F11 Foto Museum in Happy Valley to see the Alexander Rodchenko exhibit.  I will blog on that subject in the coming week or so.  

The participants completed a questionnaire where I requested for them to comment on the components of the workshop.  I was pleased to have shared beneficial information, my life experience,  and a  valuable critique with the group.  

Interestingly, when asked what topics of interest the group had for future workshops, all wanted to learn how to develop film! Now I’ve got my work cut out for me. Next time film it will be!

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: © Jeremy H. Greenberg March 2018

Where: Kennedy Town, Hong Kong

Subject:  Street Photography Workshop 

Gear: Fujfilm X-E3 + Fujinon XF 18mm f/2

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

 

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm photographer photography professional study workshop http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-98-you-better-work Tue, 27 Mar 2018 13:36:49 GMT
Blog #97 Job Description: Photographer http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-97-job-description-photographer Blog #97 Job Description: Photographer

You have just been hired! You have one job to do. Show up early, make stunning photos and deliver them in a timely manner to the client.  That sounds all fine and good but the devil is in the details as they say.  Woody Allen famously once said “80 percent of success in life is just showing up”.  Obviously you need to show up and show up early. Here, I would like to discuss the remaining 20%.

000032930027000032930027Nikon D610

You will need to be clear that you have what it takes to get the job done.  Your gear [and backup gear] must all be fully functional and working - no excuses! Failure is not an option.  Test your gear under various conditions, bring a back up body, lens, and multiple [charged and tested] batteries. 

I use a Google Forms questionnaire to understand the clients needs so that I can be confident that I understand what they intend to get out of the shoot and I can give them what they need.  I was asked once to make an image of a small group for a promotional brochure.  After working with this group one sunny and hot afternoon under time pressures and outdoors, we came up with a few good images after the obligatory two-hours of post processing.  

Nikon D610 It was only then that the client said to me “Oh, yeah these are nice but we need a portrait image not a landscape”.  Crikey! If I only knew that before! Fortunately they were able to work with one of the horizontal images that had enough on the sides to crop it for the intended usage.  The image was sent to the printer before the deadline and the day was saved. 

I got lucky there but learned by lesson.  My questionnaire gives the opportunity to the client to describe what the images will be used for, if they need black and white, color, both, portrait, landscape orientation, both, images sizes, method of deliver such as online or flash drive, both, and more. 

The old adage, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure applies even more so to photographers since we get one chance usually to get it right and that’s it. 

We will not nail every shot or every photo shoot but we can decrease the chances of failure. It’s tricky stuff making awesome images for other people. It’s thrilling when you get it right. I’ll leave you with a quote…try to guess who said it 

Luck favours the prepared, darling!

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images: JHG March 2018

Where: Temple Street, Jordan, Hong Kong

Subject:  My two favourite ladies, my dear old mother Sheryl and lovey wife Christine.  Gear: Minolta CLE, Leica 28mm f/2 lens and Kodak Ektar 100 Color 35mm film. 

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

 

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm film photographer photography professional study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-97-job-description-photographer Sat, 24 Mar 2018 09:25:08 GMT
Blog #96 What's your :DEFAULT:? http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-96-whats-your-default Blog #96 What’s your :DEFAULT: ?

Most photographers whether you are just starting out, a hobbyist, proper amateur, or a professional for many decades have a default.  A default is the “usual” or standard of some type in terms of gear. For me, it’s 35mm black and white film.  Without a specific project or commercial activity that I am working on in a given day, I will stuff one of my Nikon F-something SLRs or perhaps a Leica rangefinder mated to a 28mm with a roll of Kodak’s TMAX 400 and head out into the world.  I will occasionally shoot with a 35mm, 50mm (or zoom lens around the same range) and I do shoot colour film from time to time, but that’s my  default.  Yes, I’m old school but not all of the time.  My default digital is the Fujifilm X-E3 with a 28mm lens.  

There is a sense of familiarity and predictability that using my default package affords me.  I know where all of the buttons, dials, and focus rings are  one the camera bodies, for one.  I am intimately familiar with these three focal lengths which are not very different for starters, and I have a good feel for 400 speed black and white film and its capabilities in changing light conditions.  

Nikon D610

There are those who will advocate for using the same focal length for one year. If there is such as thing as Photographic ADD I definitely have it.  Maybe I’ve gone one whole month with the same lens and same camera…at the most.  I used to have a tendency to change lenses fairly often like week to week usually.  These days I stick to one focal length for a bit more time.  I agree with those single-lens zen photographers that there are many benefits to going steady with one focal length. 

For personal projects or just for the hell of it, 35mm black and white film is where its at for me.  It’s timeless.  It’s what I grew up on and it still looks awesome to me.  After a fair period of experimenting with cameras, lenses and films as well as digital versions of the same, I have found my “happy place”, my default.  

Experiment and then know your default.  Committing to a type of default is a type of restriction that may, in turn, spur on your creativity.  This sounds counterintuitive, granted, but it works. 

So what’s your default package? Please do share here or on my Facebook page. Maybe a survey is on the horizon?  Whatever your default is, enjoy it and exploit it. 

The light is always right.

jhg

*Images here are from Hong Kong and made with a Nikon SLR, a 28mm wide angle lens, Kodak 35mm black and white film (probably TMAX 400) and developed at home*

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

 

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

 

 

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm default film photographer photography professional study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-96-whats-your-default Fri, 23 Mar 2018 11:29:57 GMT
Blog #95 Red http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-95-red  

Blog #95 RED

 

It might seem awkward to blog about a single color but there are some facts about color and specifically the color red that I find fascinating and I hope that you will too.  Unless you’re dead set on shooting black and white all of the time forever and ever, eventually you will succumb to work in color.  

I absolutely love and prefer black and white photography to color, in general.  Ultimately, creating art and telling stories is not about cameras, focal lengths, film, grain, pixels, or color for that matter.  Making images that matter is about having an interesting story to tell and using the right medium to tell that story. It’s about using the right tool for the job.  My recent Blog #93 on Photographic Technique was about that very subject.  You will need to be proficient in using color in your images to tell some of your stories that will need to be communicated through the language of color. 

“Color” is word and a language concept that is more or less universal across cultures of the world.  Red has some special significance with regards to all of it’s brothers and sisters in the visible light spectrum.  Wait, did I just suggest that colours have a gender?  Actually, this has been established a long time ago.  Latin and romance languages such as Spanish attribute gender to colours.  Red or rojo is masculine [strong] unless used to describe a feminine object such as a red rose or rosa roja.  It’s common knowledge that roses are female, yes?

Nikon D610

There are some factors and functions of the use of the color red historically, culturally, politically, and socially that may influence how or even if we decide to include this into our images.  I’ll expand on these concepts later. 

Technically, color is a type of electromagnetic radiation [from the sun] that falls with the visible light spectrum.  There are parts of th spectrum of electromagnetic radiation that are not visible to humans such as gamma rays, X rays, ultraviolet rays, microwaves, and radio waves.  All of these particles and waves differ by their wavelength and wave frequency that are measured in units called nanometers [nm] or terahertz [THz], respectively.  The way in which color hits your eye will affect the spectrum of color on different dimensions such as intensity (brightness), and hue.  Color can be defined from a physics point of view as “class of spectra [light] that functions to result in color sensations that are species specific”.  The species reference here is used to highlight the fact that different species of animals have differences in the rods and cone structures of the eye that allow for differences in accuracy, distance, night vision, and color interpretation in the brain of the animal. 

Nikon D610

Red light is in the longer wavelength range of 700-635 nm and 430-480 THz wave frequency range reacts with the cone cells in you eye which causes an electro-chemical reaction in your brain that gives you the sensation and perception of seeing red although literally, not like the idiom seeing red meaning becoming upset or angry.  It would be natural to wonder at this point,  Is your red the same as my red? Do all people see red the same? That is a difficult question to answer, definitively, since we cannot measure perception and experience beneath the skin yet.  However, we can measure language responses to color as behaviors that can be observed, measured, and  compared across people. Therefore, a logical and reasonable response to the inquiry above might be “Yes, they are the same, probably, if viewed under similar or identical environmental conditions.  

We learn as children to talk about red and we agree on red.  Therefore, your red is my red and my red is your red. Let’s continue. 

As mentioned above, there are many ways in which the color red has influenced us culturally, historically, politically, and socially.  The list below shows ten examples.

  1. Red is the color of blood, meat, many foods, the sun [flag of Japan] fire, power, life, and death.  Stop signs are red to warn of the dangers of failing to stop while driving. 
  2. From ancient times, dyes that were used to make the color red were highly sought after, prised, and rare.  
  3. Ginger is the name given to people with red hair although red hair only occurs in about 1% of the population.  Many cultures have strong beliefs about people with this hair color that vary from ridicule to admiration.  Today, stereotypes may continue that red heads have fiery personalities.
  4. Red is used extensively in Chinese culture.  Originally used as a bright colour to evoke fear by representing blood or fire, the color red was thought to be able to scare away evil spirits. This is still used in Chinese New Year and other festivals regularly and represents good luck and good fortune.  
  5. When Director Steven Spielberg’s filmed Schindler’s List, he chose black and white.  There was one striking scene later in the movie when a little girl runs through a concentration camp wearing a bright red coat.  The movie is a remarkable story about a man named Schindler who repeatedly risked his life to employ and hide Jews during World War II in Nazi Germany when the Holocaust was happening.  The red coat gives the viewer a spark of hope, a sense that the Jews might actually survive the madness and atrocities of the time and the scene represents a very effective cinematic use of selective coloration.
  6. Red (2010 film) and Red 2 (2013 film) were American action comedies based on a DC comic book series by the same name. 
  7. During the Cold War, “The Reds” was the nickname given to Communists by the Americans and the West. This may have been a reference to the “Red Coats” name used to describe the enemy soldiers of the Crown of England during America’s Revolutionary War centuries earlier who literally wore red coats most likely with the intention of sticking fear in their enemies.  Sorry mates, but we all know who won that one! 
  8. Red has been used in many revolutions [i.e. Chinese, Russian, Vietnamese, Cuban) and in military insignia.  “Red” states are considered those who vote republican [the party of the white wealthy minority] compared to the more popular democratic blue states in America. 
  9. The Catholic Church has used red in ceremonial activities such as in the clothing of cardinals.  The Crusades, and the flag of England used red.
  10. Many activities of people in modern times are expressed using the color red. Love, Valentine’s Day, passion, happiness, ceremony, celebration, sports [Cincinnati Reds], flags of many nations, anger, aggressive behavior, warning, danger, and sexuality.

Finally, color photography tends to work well when the color or colours that are being included into the image have a defined place and role.  Red is a strong stand-alone color.  It goes great with green, blue, yellow, and its variations are countless.  Have you ever noticed that Red is usually the first color in a box of crayons, or used when teaching kindergarteners the colours of the rainbow [ROY G. BIV].  

Ted Forbes from YouTube’s The Art of Photography did a Photo Assignment on Red that is worth viewing for some inspiration on the subject of color and on red, specifically. 

The [red] light is always right!

jhg

Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610 Nikon D610

*Images here are original shot with Nikon F100 + Sunny 16 35mm Colour Film*

Website

Facebook Page 

Instagram 

Twitter

Casual Photophile Tip & Techniques No. 001 The Subject is the Subject

Digital Photography School

Japan Camera Hunter

The Inspired Eye Photography Magazine Issue #40 (full interview)

Hong Kong Free Press: HKFP Lens

Blog #25 Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark[room].

Blog #47 Composition, Composition, and More Composition

Blog #60 Atmosphere

Blog #65 Summer is for Travel (Hanoi)

Blog #67 Risks, Rules, & Restrictions

Blog #68 Photography is a Gift

Blog #69 On Restrictions

Blog #72 Living the Creative Life

Blog #85 [CAM/O]

Blog #90 Restrictions, Revisited

Blog #93 Photographic Technique

]]>
jeremyhgreenberg@me.com (Jeremy H. Greenberg) 35mm color colour film photographer photography professional red study http://jeremyhgreenberg.zenfolio.com/blog/2018/3/blog-95-red Fri, 16 Mar 2018 12:46:34 GMT